Dedicated server hardware is also limited to a single tenant usage whereas VPS hardware is shared by multiple hosting customers on one partitioned web server. The latest trends in web hosting have seen companies move beyond the single server model on cloud, VPS, & shared platforms to host multiple copies of a website's files and use network load balancing software to route traffic to the hardware with the most open processing capacity for better response times.

Quick review: AltusHost is a well-known premium hosting provider based in Netherlands. The company provides rock-solid customer support and offer three different server locations in Europe (Bulgaria, Netherlands, and Sweeden). We think AltusHost may be the right call for small businesses and individual bloggers who want a reliable EU-based hosting solution.


Many website owners are choosing VPS plans to implement advanced web page caching strategies with Nginx, Varnish Cache, & Redis that shared hosting plans do not normally provide. Advanced caching with Nginx and Varnish Cache can considerably speed up WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, & other CMS websites. VPS plans can also permit more advanced usage of APC, OPcache, &

While using a shared hosting server, you do not have access to the entire server, unlike in a VPS, where the entire virtual server is under your complete control. Hence, either you or someone you employ will have to look after the server and ensure that its performance remains optimum. If your VPS provider takes charge of maintaining the server, it is known as a managed server. On the other hand, in an unmanaged VPS, the entire responsibility of the server will rest on your shoulders.
With a dedicated server, you can install any operating system. Cloud VPS offers a limited selection (at Liquid Web, it’s CentOS 6, CentOS 7, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Debian 8, Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard, and Windows Server 2016 Standard Edition.) Otherwise, both options give you full root access with control over the OS and all the software in the environment.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
A web site that has outgrown shared hosting will benefit from VPS hosting. It is a good problem to have if your website needs more resources than our Shared or Business Hosting can provide you and Hostwinds makes a very strong effort to help you continue to grow and be successful. We make the migration easy for you to a VPS server and using a Tier 3 or Tier 4 with a cPanel license should be pretty familiar to most Hostwinds Shared or Business Hosting clients. Hostwinds VPS services are a good choice to keep your website growing and successful in today’s Cloud first world.

You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
VPS hosting is like you are living in an apartment complex. It means that other people are living in the same building, but you have your own secure apartment. You will get more room and restrictions will be fewer as compared to living in a dorm. It also means that if your neighbour is misbehaving, it is the problem of owner of building, not yours.
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A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
This doesn’t happen with VPS hosting because each mini-server has its own allotment of resources. You can’t use more resources than your allotment, but that also means that no other site can take resources from you. Basically, it is like having a smaller size dedicated server without having to pay the hefty ($100 per month or more) price tag that goes with a dedicated server.
This means just a few domains could pull an entire reseller website offline if transfer limits are not closely monitored on a regular basis. Many Cloud VPS plans offer a "pay as you go" approach to billing where only the actual amount of CPU resources, storage, and I/O processes are billed. Systems administrators and website publishers need to calculate expected monthly traffic rates when estimating how many system resources are required to support a website in production. "Pay as you go" approaches can be more costly than fixed ratio accounts, where the trade-off is typically a more advanced VPS platform and toolset.


VPS hosting is a very scalable solution by its very nature. Virtual machines don’t depend on their physical server; as we have said, they don’t even recognize it exists. If a VPS needs to be upgraded or downgraded, all a hosting provider needs to do is to adjust the limits for this VPS in a hypervisor. After reboot a guest OS will work like nothing happened, using new hardware quotas. This comes in handy if you are not able to estimate the technical specifications you need before you run some tests. Also, if you have a seasonal business (e.g. you sell beach equipment), you can choose to have a more powerful server during your peak demand season and a cheaper one for the rest of the year.

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To sum up, a Windows server is more friendly to beginners but is less flexible and more expensive. A Linux server is cheaper and offers more freedom though it requires special skills and does not have a developed support system. Still, the most important question you need to ask yourself is whether your main goal requires Windows or Linux. If you need a Linux server for your needs but do not have required skills to manage it, you can sign up for a managed VPS.


When choosing a VPS operating system, there are managed and unmanaged hosting plan options as well as "bare-metal" vs. shared-kernel hypervisor distinctions to consider. Many users upgrading websites from shared hosting plans for better VPS website performance (or more system resources to support web traffic) will look for a managed Linux plan with CentOS and cPanel that will provide the same ease of use in web server settings & domain name administration.
Shared hosting is not meant for websites that use large amounts of RAM. As your website grows and you add more and more content, you will start to see a decrease in your website’s load times. As soon as this happens, it’s an indication that you are maxing out your limits. Upgrading to a VPS will enable you to scale your website without having to worry about slow load times.
This doesn’t happen with VPS hosting because each mini-server has its own allotment of resources. You can’t use more resources than your allotment, but that also means that no other site can take resources from you. Basically, it is like having a smaller size dedicated server without having to pay the hefty ($100 per month or more) price tag that goes with a dedicated server.
I have used shared hosting for over 7 years before I finally decided to upgrade to a VPS server. When I was using shared hosting, I had so many problems with malware, slow loading time, brute force attacks and so many other issues. Now, my life is so much easier with VPS. What amazes me the most is the support team; they simply exceed my expectations and they are ALWAYS available to answer my questions.
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