With Cloud VPS, if a parent server has 64 processing cores, it can host up to 64 instances. Each instance is allocated its own bandwidth and storage, so your performance won’t be affected by other companies on the server in the way it might with shared hosting. You also get more bandwidth and storage since the hosting company is limited on the number of instances they can create on each parent server.

Hostinger provides a 6-tier plan for their VPS hosting services, which you can choose to fit the needs of your website. Their Plan 1 offers the basic specs with 1,000 GB (aka 1TB) of bandwidth, 20 GB of disk space, and about 1 GB of RAMs. If you want more, you can opt for Plan 6 which gives you a whopping 8 GB of RAM, 160 GB of disk space and 6,000 GB of bandwidth.
Shared hosting is like you are living in a room with a lot of friends. It means you must fit in the same room and you must split the cost of several things because it is affordable and cheap. However, several individuals are sharing the same space, it means everyone needs to live within a space with restricted resources among them. You will have to use the same things (that sounds a little unhygienic).
Shared hosting usually works for small to medium web sites.  A shared host may be less costly, but it does not allow total control over the hosting environment.  A shared host does not permit the use of different operating systems or the installation of custom software.  It may be true many web site owners are not interested in the administration of a server and prefer leaving it to their host.  However, it is ideal if a web site owner desires more control and needs new software that is not available in a shared web hosting environment.  When looking for VPS hosting, one should look at the resources needed, the upgrade process, the application requirements and the number of accounts needed on each server to determine the appropriate amount of resources for a VPS.  The cost should be reasonable for what is offered.
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
×