While using a shared hosting server, you do not have access to the entire server, unlike in a VPS, where the entire virtual server is under your complete control. Hence, either you or someone you employ will have to look after the server and ensure that its performance remains optimum. If your VPS provider takes charge of maintaining the server, it is known as a managed server. On the other hand, in an unmanaged VPS, the entire responsibility of the server will rest on your shoulders.
                        



There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!
Similarly, in the case of VPS, there are several users that are using the same server but they are isolated from each other. It means that no one will be affected by how much resources another is using. You will get the speed and security that you need without compromise. It is almost a perfect scenario because you will get the benefits of a private server with shared cost of services.
Yes, VPS is a powerful and versatile type of hosting that many companies will find meets their needs. If you’re already hosting in a different type of environment, you may be wondering whether it’s worthwhile to migrate to VPS. This is an important discussion to have with each prospective hosting provider in order to understand how they handle migrations, what would be required from you, how long it might take, and any costs associated.

If you want to select a VPS provider located in a foreign country, you will be subject to a ridiculous amount in fees and service charges. Furthermore, you are also likely to suffer losses due to the exchange rate. On the other hand, since the government has absolutely no involvement in transactions made by bitcoins, the fees are actually minimal and may even be considered negligible by some.


If you host it in a VPS environment, your site won't share resources with neighboring sites, the way it would with shared hosting. In fact, your site lives in a partitioned server area that has its own operating system, storage, RAM, and monthly data transfer limits, so you can expect smoother, more stable site performance. The sites with which you share your server are far less likely to affect your site—or even take it down altogether—than they would be on a shared site. Knowing how VPS setups operate is just the first step, however. You still need to familiarize yourself with the essential features needed for building a rock-solid, VPS-hosted website.

In answering this question, maybe it’s better to examine how VPS hosting fits in to the overall offerings of most hosting companies. Shared hosting is just that – your site is hosted on a machine with a bunch of other sites, and each of you share the same resources, including RAM, disk space, and CPU.  Your site uses what it needs if it’s available, and if it’s not – well, that’s the limitation of shared hosting. Likewise, a dedicated server is also self-explanatory –  your site is the only one hosted on server, and you have all the aforementioned resources available at your beck and call. Dedicated hosting is therefore  for those large sites with big databases and lots of traffic, whereas the limitations of shared hosting’s usually prevent it from housing that kind of site. Dedicated servers are also relatively expensive, while one can get a shared hosting plan for under $10 per month.
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