VPS hosting is a very scalable solution by its very nature. Virtual machines don’t depend on their physical server; as we have said, they don’t even recognize it exists. If a VPS needs to be upgraded or downgraded, all a hosting provider needs to do is to adjust the limits for this VPS in a hypervisor. After reboot a guest OS will work like nothing happened, using new hardware quotas. This comes in handy if you are not able to estimate the technical specifications you need before you run some tests. Also, if you have a seasonal business (e.g. you sell beach equipment), you can choose to have a more powerful server during your peak demand season and a cheaper one for the rest of the year.
A VPS ( Virtual Private Server ) is a shared server platform that mimics all features and functions of a Dedicated server. A VPS will have it’s own operating system and customers will get access with full administrative privileges. This means you can install anything upon it and customize to how you see fit. It is much more affordable and economical than a dedicated server. The whole process of provisioning, upgrading, and downgrading a VPS is quicker compared to a dedicated server. Most of the process are automated and can be managed from my.interserver.net
There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!
Private VPS Parent Hosting is a way to get the benefits of virtualization without sharing a parent server with other companies. This is a robust, flexible, and isolated virtual solution that gives you sole control over a built-to-order parent server and its resources. That means you can add as many VPS environments as the server allows and control them all as you see fit.
 
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
• Free SSL Certificate
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
Each of these stack layers contain I/O routes for anonymous public network requests that must be penetration-tested by web security professionals. Users on managed plans can expect the hosting company to keep all of the web server stack software updated with security patches, while website owners under unmanaged plans will need to keep these aspects up-to-date personally.
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
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