There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!
Keep firmly in your mind the sort of assets that you require to serve your site(s) when seeking a host. Cost in a VPS is important, but not as key as you might think. VPS resource availability is scalable, so the cost that needs to be looked at is comparable cost from one host to the next. Also – as cPanel revised their pricing model recently, web hosting companies across the board will have to pass those costs on to users sooner or later. You will need to consider the cost of control panel when selecting a VPS plan. Companies like ScalaHosting has developed their own control panel to mitigate this issue – so their users would have little issues with the price hike.
If you currently have a shared hosting plan, the main reason to move to a VPS hosting plan is resource utilization. The issue really isn’t that your website is running slow, but rather it needs to be able to handle more web traffic. Your current web host will usually inform you when you’re exceeding shared hosting resource limits. That’s the ideal time to switch to VPS. With a virtual private server, you’ll have your own operating system and dedicated resources for increased power. Your site will then be able to handle increased traffic. And, you’ll have even better insulation from other hosting customers.
A VPS doesn’t just have more RAM, disk space, and a  proprietary share of CPU than a shared account. Depending on the provider, some VPS plans offer burstable memory, which is a pool of RAM set aside for extraordinary events. This is the stuff that can help counter the so-called “Digg-effect,” that much-whispered about occurrence that’s the simultaneous hope and fear of everyone who runs a web site. When you have an unexpected high traffic event, burstable memory will call on a pool of reserved, shared memory to satisfy the needs of temporary high traffic. This is not available on shared servers and, while the necessary memory is available on a dedicated server, your site might not get the kind of traffic on a daily basis to justify the expense of a dedicated server. Again, not all VPS plans have burstable memory, so ask your provider if their VPS plans do.
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VPS hosting is a very scalable solution by its very nature. Virtual machines don’t depend on their physical server; as we have said, they don’t even recognize it exists. If a VPS needs to be upgraded or downgraded, all a hosting provider needs to do is to adjust the limits for this VPS in a hypervisor. After reboot a guest OS will work like nothing happened, using new hardware quotas. This comes in handy if you are not able to estimate the technical specifications you need before you run some tests. Also, if you have a seasonal business (e.g. you sell beach equipment), you can choose to have a more powerful server during your peak demand season and a cheaper one for the rest of the year.
What is mining exactly? It is solving the same mathematical problem over and over again. In the early days of BitCoin, it was profitable to use CPU capabilities for mining. But the truth is CPU is not meant for performing repetitive tasks all day long. CPU mining is not fast enough, compared to GPU mining or more sophisticated solutions like Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). Taking into account a hosting fee that you will need to pay for a VPS, your profit will be next to nothing. That is why we do not recommend using a VPS for mining.
If you currently have a shared hosting plan, the main reason to move to a VPS hosting plan is resource utilization. The issue really isn’t that your website is running slow, but rather it needs to be able to handle more web traffic. Your current web host will usually inform you when you’re exceeding shared hosting resource limits. That’s the ideal time to switch to VPS. With a virtual private server, you’ll have your own operating system and dedicated resources for increased power. Your site will then be able to handle increased traffic. And, you’ll have even better insulation from other hosting customers.
Keep firmly in your mind the sort of assets that you require to serve your site(s) when seeking a host. Cost in a VPS is important, but not as key as you might think. VPS resource availability is scalable, so the cost that needs to be looked at is comparable cost from one host to the next. Also – as cPanel revised their pricing model recently, web hosting companies across the board will have to pass those costs on to users sooner or later. You will need to consider the cost of control panel when selecting a VPS plan. Companies like ScalaHosting has developed their own control panel to mitigate this issue – so their users would have little issues with the price hike.
A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.
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Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.

If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.

In answering this question, maybe it’s better to examine how VPS hosting fits in to the overall offerings of most hosting companies. Shared hosting is just that – your site is hosted on a machine with a bunch of other sites, and each of you share the same resources, including RAM, disk space, and CPU.  Your site uses what it needs if it’s available, and if it’s not – well, that’s the limitation of shared hosting. Likewise, a dedicated server is also self-explanatory –  your site is the only one hosted on server, and you have all the aforementioned resources available at your beck and call. Dedicated hosting is therefore  for those large sites with big databases and lots of traffic, whereas the limitations of shared hosting’s usually prevent it from housing that kind of site. Dedicated servers are also relatively expensive, while one can get a shared hosting plan for under $10 per month.
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