The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.

Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
VPS stands for Virtual Private Server and refers to a private, emulated dedicated hosting environment created through virtualization on a host (a computer or other device connected to other computers or devices via a network), server (called the “parent server”), or cluster of servers. It acts like a physical server but, in reality, it’s a piece of software that’s emulating dedicated hardware.
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There are numerous open source Linux virtualization platforms based on KVM, while Microsoft has Hyper-V with Windows cloud servers, Citrix maintains the Xen server framework, and VMware has a number of different hypervisor frameworks such as ESXi. Hypervisors permit the managing of multiple web servers independently on shared hardware each with isolated databases, file storage, and I/O request processing.



Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.
A great advantage of VPS, compared to both shared and dedicated solutions is snapshot technology support. A snapshot is a state of a system at a certain point in time. It works like game saves in your favorite computer game. If a game is not going well, you can exit and start from a checkpoint. A snapshot works the same way; if you need to go back in time, your system can be restored from a snapshot to its previous state. It is extremely useful in case of a system failure or simply if you run complex tests and wish to save your progress. Unlike a backup option that copies the whole system each time you run it, a snapshot contains only changes. This means that a snapshot takes less space than a backup and can be created/restored quicker. It does not mean that you do not need backups though. Backups are still life-savers in case of operating system failure. Don’t forget to store them externally.
                                                

Nice read Rahul ! While you compare all hosting types, I would like to point out one important thing related to shared hosting. Undoubtedly, VPS hosting has become the most popular hosting type in short span, but shared hosting has its own benefits. First and most important one is – Shared Hosting is by Default Fully Managed, that means you don’t have to worry about security of your website, server updates, software update, spamming from your mailboxes, etc.
All FastComet VPS hosting plans include many free features, such as application, module, and template installation and free daily/weekly backup and restore of your files, CDN, and web firewall. All of these features, combined with their high reliability and reasonable pricing is making FastComet one of the fastest growing hosting companies.

Michael Lavnduski:

Max Ostryzhko:
The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.
When smartphones took over in the early 2000s, data usage and cellphone bills went through the roof for many families — mine included. My family’s shared data plan wasn’t perfect — some months, someone would rack up data usage and leave the rest of us strapped — but it allowed each person to pay a lot less per month than if we each had an unlimited data plan.
Having your own guaranteed CPU and RAM gives you a great deal of autonomy. You don’t have to share them with any other accounts, so no matter what anyone else does they will never slow you down. Regular shared hosting is okay if your website traffic doesn’t change much, but if there’s a chance it might need more horsepower then VPS is far more flexible. And from a security point of view, the fact that VPS hosting accounts are cleverly separated on the same server makes them much more robust than a shared hosting solution.
If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.
Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.
The more content you add to your website over time, the slower it will run. There are often a few causes for this common problem, but there’s a good chance that your site is slow because you’ve finally hit your shared hosting limits. In order to boost your site’s speed, it’s a good idea to upgrade from shared hosting to VPS hosting to decrease page loading times.
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