Quick review: AltusHost is a well-known premium hosting provider based in Netherlands. The company provides rock-solid customer support and offer three different server locations in Europe (Bulgaria, Netherlands, and Sweeden). We think AltusHost may be the right call for small businesses and individual bloggers who want a reliable EU-based hosting solution.
There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!
On the other hand, there are still some applications which are only supported on Windows and not on Linux. Hence, if you use technologies such as ASP.NET and ASP, then you may be better off with Windows rather than Linux.
We’ve recommended InMotion’s Business Hosting Plans for many years now. However, their VPS Hosting plans take things to another level. First of all, with InMotion Hosting’s VPS you get real-time redundancy—meaning, if there is an issue with your server, your website will be available almost instantly on another server in the cluster. This high availability feature is powered by a cloud infrastructure. The combination of VPS and cloud hosting benefits make InMotion Hosting one of our top picks. But, you actually get much more with their VPS Hosting plans.
"Root" gives you administrative level access to edit, install and configure all of the files on your server, including system-critical files. It gives you ultimate access to your server. This gives you the ability to configure your server to your exact needs. While root access gives you full control of your server, it is intended for experienced users, engineers and developers. That's because you do have the potential to misconfigure or delete those system critial files if you're unfamiliar or inexperienced with what you're doing.
One of the most important factors that you need to keep in mind is the operating system of your server. Currently, Linux and Windows are the two most popular operating systems being offered by providers. Since Linux is an open source software, it costs less than Windows. In addition, it is also considered to be more user friendly while supporting a far greater range of applications as well.

A virtual private server (VPS) is a virtual machine (something like a computer divided into many smaller machines using special software).[1] They are often used by Internet hosting providers. Multiple VPS's run on the same machine, but they are separated as they will only share hardware resources without interfering on software level. A VPS is dedicated to the customer's needs, has the privacy of a separate physical computer, and can run server software. There are many platforms that can run a VPS. Some of them are VMWare and Xen.[2]
When you create a website, you have to pay a company to host it on their server. This is a powerful computer that allows anyone on the internet to connect and access your site. The lowest level of server is a shared hosting plan where hundreds of websites (and all their data) are stored on one server with all of the server’s resources up for grabs depending on who needs them.
A VPS doesn’t just have more RAM, disk space, and a  proprietary share of CPU than a shared account. Depending on the provider, some VPS plans offer burstable memory, which is a pool of RAM set aside for extraordinary events. This is the stuff that can help counter the so-called “Digg-effect,” that much-whispered about occurrence that’s the simultaneous hope and fear of everyone who runs a web site. When you have an unexpected high traffic event, burstable memory will call on a pool of reserved, shared memory to satisfy the needs of temporary high traffic. This is not available on shared servers and, while the necessary memory is available on a dedicated server, your site might not get the kind of traffic on a daily basis to justify the expense of a dedicated server. Again, not all VPS plans have burstable memory, so ask your provider if their VPS plans do.
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