Of course, one of the most important factors in selecting a VPS is the cost attached to it. VPS providers will charge more for managed hosting and for using high end resources. Hence, you need to select a VPS which will not only operate effectively, but will also not cause a sizeable hole in your wallet.

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Hostinger provides a 6-tier plan for their VPS hosting services, which you can choose to fit the needs of your website. Their Plan 1 offers the basic specs with 1,000 GB (aka 1TB) of bandwidth, 20 GB of disk space, and about 1 GB of RAMs. If you want more, you can opt for Plan 6 which gives you a whopping 8 GB of RAM, 160 GB of disk space and 6,000 GB of bandwidth.
Affordability

Similarly, in the case of VPS, there are several users that are using the same server but they are isolated from each other. It means that no one will be affected by how much resources another is using. You will get the speed and security that you need without compromise. It is almost a perfect scenario because you will get the benefits of a private server with shared cost of services.
You could end up purchasing the most expensive VPS in the world and yet, problems are bound to arise. On such occasions, an excellent customer support is almost an integral requirement. If the issue does not allow your server to operate properly and the customer support does not respond within an appropriate time limit, then you will end up losing customers. Hence, make sure that the customer support of the VPS providers is up to the mark.
Website owners with misconfigured CMS scripts or out of date security versions of code risk MySQL injections particularly that can lead to the theft of an entire database. VPS admin login panels, cPanel logins, FTP connection routes, and email servers running on Apache are all common attack vectors for script bots which are programmed to target common URL structures on domains.

If you host it in a VPS environment, your site won't share resources with neighboring sites, the way it would with shared hosting. In fact, your site lives in a partitioned server area that has its own operating system, storage, RAM, and monthly data transfer limits, so you can expect smoother, more stable site performance. The sites with which you share your server are far less likely to affect your site—or even take it down altogether—than they would be on a shared site. Knowing how VPS setups operate is just the first step, however. You still need to familiarize yourself with the essential features needed for building a rock-solid, VPS-hosted website.


Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.
Dedicated server hardware is also limited to a single tenant usage whereas VPS hardware is shared by multiple hosting customers on one partitioned web server. The latest trends in web hosting have seen companies move beyond the single server model on cloud, VPS, & shared platforms to host multiple copies of a website's files and use network load balancing software to route traffic to the hardware with the most open processing capacity for better response times.
A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
Hostinger provides a 6-tier plan for their VPS hosting services, which you can choose to fit the needs of your website. Their Plan 1 offers the basic specs with 1,000 GB (aka 1TB) of bandwidth, 20 GB of disk space, and about 1 GB of RAMs. If you want more, you can opt for Plan 6 which gives you a whopping 8 GB of RAM, 160 GB of disk space and 6,000 GB of bandwidth.

A VPS doesn’t just have more RAM, disk space, and a  proprietary share of CPU than a shared account. Depending on the provider, some VPS plans offer burstable memory, which is a pool of RAM set aside for extraordinary events. This is the stuff that can help counter the so-called “Digg-effect,” that much-whispered about occurrence that’s the simultaneous hope and fear of everyone who runs a web site. When you have an unexpected high traffic event, burstable memory will call on a pool of reserved, shared memory to satisfy the needs of temporary high traffic. This is not available on shared servers and, while the necessary memory is available on a dedicated server, your site might not get the kind of traffic on a daily basis to justify the expense of a dedicated server. Again, not all VPS plans have burstable memory, so ask your provider if their VPS plans do.
From the above mentioned reasons, it is clear to see why cloud servers are such a favorite amongst the VPS crowd. Not only do they offer several benefits and are more secure, stable and efficient, they are extremely economical as well which is why they are preferred especially by those who are new to the business of running websites and hence, do not have a large or flexible budget.

As you can see, a VPS can be the perfect middle ground for many – enough flexibility and resources for those who need more access or control than on a shared server but without the cost of a dedicated server. If you need root access, you can’t get that on a shared server, but you can get it on a VPS. If your site experiences unpredictable swings memory usage, and your host provides it, then the presence of burstable memory will be attractive. And, if you’re a fan of customization, then the fact that you can customize server-level software such as PHP, MySQL, and Apache will perk your interest.  In short, choosing a VPS will allow you to have many of the same characteristics of a dedicated server but in a more affordable and manageable package.
You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
Shared hosting is not meant for websites that use large amounts of RAM. As your website grows and you add more and more content, you will start to see a decrease in your website’s load times. As soon as this happens, it’s an indication that you are maxing out your limits. Upgrading to a VPS will enable you to scale your website without having to worry about slow load times.
Yes, it’s secure. VPS security comes from each instance’s isolation from the other environments on the server. Contrast that with shared hosting, where environments are sharing the same resources and can be affected by each other’s vulnerabilities. A denial of service attack on a website in a shared environment can bring down other companies’ data and websites hosted on that server, where each VPS environment is isolated and protected.
Ask most website owners about hosting and they’ll happily explain what shared, dedicated and cloud hosting is. But when it comes to virtual private servers, lots of them aren’t 100% sure what VPS are or what they’re best suited for. Some don’t even know that there is a VPS hosting option. So, to put everyone clearly in the picture, this article will give you a full introduction to VPS.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
With VPS, you pay for what you use in the sense that you select a certain amount of bandwidth and storage to be allocated in advance. Scaling involves resizing your resources. But with cloud hosting, you pay for what you use in that your resource levels are not pre-determined, which means unpredictable pricing that tends to be more costly than VPS due to the overhead and complexity involved.
VMware is also extremely popular in enterprise IT for virtualization, with the ability to run any Linux distribution as well as Windows servers in private, public, and hybrid cloud orchestrations. Unmanaged VPS plans can be installed with Ubuntu, RHEL, Slackware, Debian, Rancher OS, BSD, CentOS, CloudLinux, Windows, etc. as required by the user preferences or project requirements.
Yes, VPS is a powerful and versatile type of hosting that many companies will find meets their needs. If you’re already hosting in a different type of environment, you may be wondering whether it’s worthwhile to migrate to VPS. This is an important discussion to have with each prospective hosting provider in order to understand how they handle migrations, what would be required from you, how long it might take, and any costs associated.
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VPS Web Hosting is ideal for business sites and websites that require increased resources to handle more traffic than a shared hosting plan allows. And with Managed VPS Hosting plans simplifying the process, you don’t need to be a tech expert to use VPS Hosting for your websites. Here our three VPS Hosting Plans we would put at the top of any list.
If you are building something or trying to run an untested application, it is better to do it on a dedicated server platform. If your application cause any issues and starts affecting our physical server then we may need to suspend or shutdown your service without notice. A dedicated server is a standalone server in which you can do and test anything in it.

If you are familiar with hosting control panels, shell commands, and you have basic server administration and troubleshooting skills, then unmanaged VPS is the way to go. Note that while you purchase self­ managed VPS, you should be capable of managing applications, software, services installed on your VPS. Also, you must know installation/un­installations, resource monitoring, server performance tweaking and troubleshooting of any technical issues.


The more content you add to your website over time, the slower it will run. There are often a few causes for this common problem, but there’s a good chance that your site is slow because you’ve finally hit your shared hosting limits. In order to boost your site’s speed, it’s a good idea to upgrade from shared hosting to VPS hosting to decrease page loading times.
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