A VPS ( Virtual Private Server ) is a shared server platform that mimics all features and functions of a Dedicated server. A VPS will have it’s own operating system and customers will get access with full administrative privileges. This means you can install anything upon it and customize to how you see fit. It is much more affordable and economical than a dedicated server. The whole process of provisioning, upgrading, and downgrading a VPS is quicker compared to a dedicated server. Most of the process are automated and can be managed from my.interserver.net
With Cloud VPS, if a parent server has 64 processing cores, it can host up to 64 instances. Each instance is allocated its own bandwidth and storage, so your performance won’t be affected by other companies on the server in the way it might with shared hosting. You also get more bandwidth and storage since the hosting company is limited on the number of instances they can create on each parent server.
The customer support team delivers an outstanding service. They are very friendly, responsive and highly professional.
Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.
In order to be able to make consistent or recurring payments with bitcoins, it would be a good idea to generate and then email the service provider with a new bitcoin address for each transaction which should be paid before the cutoff. You should then track the address in order to ensure that timely payment has been made.


InMotion VPS hosting offers a managed server with a management and security update plan, so business owners can concentrate on the business itself, and leave the complicated matter of site management to InMotion’s team of experts. This is generally a more popular option instead of self hosting, as the majority of business owners are not computer experts, and don’t have a dedicated website manager on staff.

Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]


There will be a point in your life where the needs of your website will be too much for a shared hosting server to manage and VPS hosting will eventually become a necessity for you. Meanwhile, you need to take great care to ensure that the VPS which you select is appropriate for your needs and requirements. Hence, you need to start by making a list of your requirements and then comparing various servers before coming to a conclusion on the best possible server for you.
VPS, on the other hand, is an isolated playground specifically for you. You will be able to install and use any professional software you need. It also provides more opportunities for caching the content. Imagine that you implement caching tools to provide your users with better experience and reduce the loading time of your website. Caching means that the part of requests to your website will be processed using RAM instead of a hard drive. Eventually, RAM will be filled with these requests. Since VPS deals offer more RAM then shared packages, you will get better performance using caching.
Rahul, perfect inside scoop on VPS hosting. I see the great impact after moving from shared server to my own VPS. I have my VPS with so-called known Web host. But, I am not satisfied at some extent. My server freezes for 30-40 minutes on daily basis in pick hours. The host says there is no issue. But, I assume they have oversold VPS on the host server. I am planning to move my site from their server to VPS that I am purchasing from you. I have a concern of data migration. I have a single site with one MSSQL database. The total size of files and databases is less than 1 GB. Will your support team assist me in migration?

A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]

Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
A VPS doesn’t just have more RAM, disk space, and a  proprietary share of CPU than a shared account. Depending on the provider, some VPS plans offer burstable memory, which is a pool of RAM set aside for extraordinary events. This is the stuff that can help counter the so-called “Digg-effect,” that much-whispered about occurrence that’s the simultaneous hope and fear of everyone who runs a web site. When you have an unexpected high traffic event, burstable memory will call on a pool of reserved, shared memory to satisfy the needs of temporary high traffic. This is not available on shared servers and, while the necessary memory is available on a dedicated server, your site might not get the kind of traffic on a daily basis to justify the expense of a dedicated server. Again, not all VPS plans have burstable memory, so ask your provider if their VPS plans do.

If you are familiar with hosting control panels, shell commands, and you have basic server administration and troubleshooting skills, then unmanaged VPS is the way to go. Note that while you purchase self­ managed VPS, you should be capable of managing applications, software, services installed on your VPS. Also, you must know installation/un­installations, resource monitoring, server performance tweaking and troubleshooting of any technical issues.
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