With a standard shared hosting plan, you’re at the whims of other webmasters who share the same server. Some companies put hundreds of websites on the same physical server. If one of those sites experiences significant growth or gets a sudden influx of traffic, your site’s performance will suffer. There are only so many resources to go around. When one site needs more resources, it’ll hog them and cause issues with the other sites.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]

Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
Quick review: AltusHost is a well-known premium hosting provider based in Netherlands. The company provides rock-solid customer support and offer three different server locations in Europe (Bulgaria, Netherlands, and Sweeden). We think AltusHost may be the right call for small businesses and individual bloggers who want a reliable EU-based hosting solution.
Of course, virtual private server providers have noted this trend as well. Not to be left behind, there are several providers all over the world who allow you to pay for servers via bitcoins in addition to other methods as well.
Photo hosting providers usually have free and paid plans, so you don’t even need to pay to use them. Unfortunately, your clients will be paying the price for it by seeing ads when browsing your portfolio. It might be okay for a beginner but does not look very professional. If you get a paid plan, you will be able to use the provider's interface only without the ability to install something else.
• Turbo SSD Hosting

There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!


• Free SSL Certificate

We’ve recommended InMotion’s Business Hosting Plans for many years now. However, their VPS Hosting plans take things to another level. First of all, with InMotion Hosting’s VPS you get real-time redundancy—meaning, if there is an issue with your server, your website will be available almost instantly on another server in the cluster. This high availability feature is powered by a cloud infrastructure. The combination of VPS and cloud hosting benefits make InMotion Hosting one of our top picks. But, you actually get much more with their VPS Hosting plans.

If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.

You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
The answer to this question is a definitive “maybe.” Since you’re looking at this site, you might be a Web designer who has a few sites, an online portfolio, and a couple of long-standing clients whose sites you manage. Is a VPS for you? Well, you’ve most likely outgrown a shared platform, and as a professional, it won’t do to have your site run poorly because another site that you share a server with is using more than its fair share of resources. A dedicated server could be overkill – if you don’t need all the resources on a consistent basis, you may not be able to justify the expense.
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