With a standard shared hosting plan, you’re at the whims of other webmasters who share the same server. Some companies put hundreds of websites on the same physical server. If one of those sites experiences significant growth or gets a sudden influx of traffic, your site’s performance will suffer. There are only so many resources to go around. When one site needs more resources, it’ll hog them and cause issues with the other sites.
On the other hand, there are still some applications which are only supported on Windows and not on Linux. Hence, if you use technologies such as ASP.NET and ASP, then you may be better off with Windows rather than Linux.

FastComet offers multiple configurations for VPS hosting, all of which are cloud-based, include SSD storage, and are fully managed and monitored. The VPS servers are optimized for many popular applications and frameworks, including WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, and OpenCart. All VPS plans also include 24x7 support for both your infrastructure and applications – with a 10-minute response time! If you are an experienced server administrator you can also have root access to your VPS.


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If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.


The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.

Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.


Simply put, shared hosting means your site will share the same server as many other sites. It’s usually the cheapest option but comes with limited bandwidth, administration, and performance capabilities. VPS hosting is a more premium option, with the ability for greater customization and increased performance. But, as with any premium service, you’ll have to pay more to get more.
Expert Overview
For years, Minecraft has inspired creativity in players. The size of the Minecraft world is bigger than the planet Earth. It is a ridiculously large playground where you can build something on your own or collaborate with other players. If you prefer multiplayer, you can set your own server up and create the world for you and your friends. Running your own server gives your certain power: you can choose a game mode, invite and ban players, change their spawn points, etc. There are a number of advantages you will get if choose to set a Minecraft server on a VPS instead of your home PC:

Two unique features that InMotion VPS hosting provides for free are the Resource Monitoring Dashboard which provides you with charts and graphs to monitor resource usage and allocation on your VPS partition and the Live-State Snapshots functionality, which goes beyond the (free) daily backups and allow you to restore your machine to a specific “known” working state.

Do you remember those times when you were living on a college campus with very noisy roommates? Or maybe they were super quiet and you enjoyed every day? The point is, it was a gamble - you never knew whom you ended up with. This is pretty much the same as having shared hosting account - you haven’t the faintest idea who is your roommate on a server. The analogy may sound funny but if someone on a shared server becomes a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack target or get blocked for mass mailing, other accounts on the server will be affected as well. Also, if a shared account abuses server resources, the whole server will be impacted. Using a VPS is like owning a house with a 9 foot privacy fence. You won’t be bothered no matter what your neighbors are doing.


To sum up, a Windows server is more friendly to beginners but is less flexible and more expensive. A Linux server is cheaper and offers more freedom though it requires special skills and does not have a developed support system. Still, the most important question you need to ask yourself is whether your main goal requires Windows or Linux. If you need a Linux server for your needs but do not have required skills to manage it, you can sign up for a managed VPS.

 
If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
Learning how to set up a VPS after upgrading from shared hosting is like leaving the kiddie pool to dive into an Olympic-sized one. You have a lot more room and features to play with, but you’ll need to find your footing before you can start having fun. Now that you know how to configure your VPS, you’ve become acquainted with the command line, which will make it a lot easier to set everything up to your liking.
For years, Minecraft has inspired creativity in players. The size of the Minecraft world is bigger than the planet Earth. It is a ridiculously large playground where you can build something on your own or collaborate with other players. If you prefer multiplayer, you can set your own server up and create the world for you and your friends. Running your own server gives your certain power: you can choose a game mode, invite and ban players, change their spawn points, etc. There are a number of advantages you will get if choose to set a Minecraft server on a VPS instead of your home PC:
Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.
If you are familiar with hosting control panels, shell commands, and you have basic server administration and troubleshooting skills, then unmanaged VPS is the way to go. Note that while you purchase self­ managed VPS, you should be capable of managing applications, software, services installed on your VPS. Also, you must know installation/un­installations, resource monitoring, server performance tweaking and troubleshooting of any technical issues.
VPS stands for Virtual Private Server and refers to a private, emulated dedicated hosting environment created through virtualization on a host (a computer or other device connected to other computers or devices via a network), server (called the “parent server”), or cluster of servers. It acts like a physical server but, in reality, it’s a piece of software that’s emulating dedicated hardware.
To sum up, a Windows server is more friendly to beginners but is less flexible and more expensive. A Linux server is cheaper and offers more freedom though it requires special skills and does not have a developed support system. Still, the most important question you need to ask yourself is whether your main goal requires Windows or Linux. If you need a Linux server for your needs but do not have required skills to manage it, you can sign up for a managed VPS.

The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.


Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
However, if a bad user shares your server with you, they can threaten your security and allow hackers to easily reach your content and critical data. Furthermore, because you’re all sharing the same resources, if any of the users that you’re sharing your server with use a lot of memory or their site has a lot of traffic, your website’s performance is likely to suffer.
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