There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!
VMware is also extremely popular in enterprise IT for virtualization, with the ability to run any Linux distribution as well as Windows servers in private, public, and hybrid cloud orchestrations. Unmanaged VPS plans can be installed with Ubuntu, RHEL, Slackware, Debian, Rancher OS, BSD, CentOS, CloudLinux, Windows, etc. as required by the user preferences or project requirements.
Hostinger offers one of the cheapest VPS plans on the market. For only a few bucks a month, you can dip your toes into the world of VPS hosting. The most affordable plan only has 1 CPU core, 1 GB of RAM, and 20 GB of storage. However, the highest plan features 8 cores, 8 GB of RAM, and 160 GB of storage. There are eight plans in total, allowing you to choose the best one for your needs.
And if your “neighbor” on the server is hacked, there’s little chance the infection will spread to your VPS because the hypervisors that are used to create separate VPS environments deliver multi-layered network security and keep tight controls on what enters and leaves. Your root access also means you can add or customize your VPS security software as you please.
What is VPS hosting? Basically, VPS hosting (Virtual Private Server hosting) is a service that gives you a web server’s hardware to share with others without sharing the software. This means that you can have complete root control over the server as if it were your own dedicated server but you will still share the CPU, RAM, and bandwidth with other users. You can still have guaranteed CPU, disk space, and memory. This means you can install whatever you want.
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
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Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.

Unmanaged hosting requires that you ask your IT team members (or, often, a single IT person) to do the work of a skilled, full-time hosting team while also performing their other duties. And, unless you want to open up the risk of downtime, they’ll have to perform those duties 24/7/365. As you can imagine, the results are typically not as good and companies often end up paying more in the long run due to security breaches and downtime when they choose to go with unmanaged hosting.


Taking into account that a VPS acts as a separate server and requires minimal server administration skills, the majority of hosting providers offer paid support for their VPS plans. Such VPS are called managed or fully managed. With a managed plan, a user still has the freedom to choose software and control their VPS, and the hosting company provides the user with server administrationsupport. In some cases, getting a managed or fully managed Linux VPS might be cheaper than getting a Windows server.

You could end up purchasing the most expensive VPS in the world and yet, problems are bound to arise. On such occasions, an excellent customer support is almost an integral requirement. If the issue does not allow your server to operate properly and the customer support does not respond within an appropriate time limit, then you will end up losing customers. Hence, make sure that the customer support of the VPS providers is up to the mark.

When smartphones took over in the early 2000s, data usage and cellphone bills went through the roof for many families — mine included. My family’s shared data plan wasn’t perfect — some months, someone would rack up data usage and leave the rest of us strapped — but it allowed each person to pay a lot less per month than if we each had an unlimited data plan.


Yes, it’s secure. VPS security comes from each instance’s isolation from the other environments on the server. Contrast that with shared hosting, where environments are sharing the same resources and can be affected by each other’s vulnerabilities. A denial of service attack on a website in a shared environment can bring down other companies’ data and websites hosted on that server, where each VPS environment is isolated and protected.
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