Shared hosting is cheap and allows you to install any gallery platform you wish if a hosting plan meets its requirements. But be careful and study your hosting provider’s Acceptable Use Policy thoroughly. The truth is, that even if they claim unlimited storage with their plans, they don’t want you to use much of it. On the contrary, they secretly hope that you will use less and they can host many other clients on the same server. For that reason, hosting providers usually put limitations on their policies (e.g. “no more than 10 GB for images,” etc.). So don’t be convinced that you have unlimited storage without first checking your shared hosting provider's policies or you will find your account suspended someday.

Shared hosting is not meant for websites that use large amounts of RAM. As your website grows and you add more and more content, you will start to see a decrease in your website’s load times. As soon as this happens, it’s an indication that you are maxing out your limits. Upgrading to a VPS will enable you to scale your website without having to worry about slow load times.
Hostinger provides a 6-tier plan for their VPS hosting services, which you can choose to fit the needs of your website. Their Plan 1 offers the basic specs with 1,000 GB (aka 1TB) of bandwidth, 20 GB of disk space, and about 1 GB of RAMs. If you want more, you can opt for Plan 6 which gives you a whopping 8 GB of RAM, 160 GB of disk space and 6,000 GB of bandwidth.

within a web browser. Most wiki solutions offer an easy markup language so even non-technical users are able to edit a page. Wikis are often times used,
Another drawback of cheap VPS hosting is that it might not deliver round-the-clock support from knowledgeable or helpful staff. That can mean that, if and when downtime happens, it’s difficult to get answers much less issue resolution. You may also find that cheaper providers use less reputable security software and protocol or don’t provide security at all.
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With VPS Hosting, there are multiple instances of separate operating systems on a machine—thus giving you your own virtual private server. So while you still may be sharing a physical server at the data center, with your own virtual operating system, you’re able to have dedicated resources such as RAM, bandwidth, and disk space. In other words, the environment mimics having a dedicated server—at a lower cost!
With VPS, you pay for what you use in the sense that you select a certain amount of bandwidth and storage to be allocated in advance. Scaling involves resizing your resources. But with cloud hosting, you pay for what you use in that your resource levels are not pre-determined, which means unpredictable pricing that tends to be more costly than VPS due to the overhead and complexity involved.
There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!
If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.
Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.
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InMotion Hosting includes managed hosting features for advanced server optimization with your VPS—including updates for LAMP stack, cPanel, and WHM, as well as OS security patches. You also get a free cPanel license and multiple dedicated IP addresses. We also like the snapshot functionality which allows you to revert to a previous instance of your files and processes. And, InMotion does not limit you to a certain number of CPU cores.


While using a shared hosting server, you do not have access to the entire server, unlike in a VPS, where the entire virtual server is under your complete control. Hence, either you or someone you employ will have to look after the server and ensure that its performance remains optimum. If your VPS provider takes charge of maintaining the server, it is known as a managed server. On the other hand, in an unmanaged VPS, the entire responsibility of the server will rest on your shoulders.
Rahul, perfect inside scoop on VPS hosting. I see the great impact after moving from shared server to my own VPS. I have my VPS with so-called known Web host. But, I am not satisfied at some extent. My server freezes for 30-40 minutes on daily basis in pick hours. The host says there is no issue. But, I assume they have oversold VPS on the host server. I am planning to move my site from their server to VPS that I am purchasing from you. I have a concern of data migration. I have a single site with one MSSQL database. The total size of files and databases is less than 1 GB. Will your support team assist me in migration?

There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!


A virtual private server (VPS) is a cost-effective way for a small business to gain more flexibility and efficiency than is offered with shared hosting without the expense associated with running a dedicated server. Most small businesses also don’t need all the power of a dedicated server, so VPS provides a good in-between option when you outgrow your shared hosting. Get the power and flexibility of your own server without the cost and complexity of managing outsourced hardware.
Do you remember those times when you were living on a college campus with very noisy roommates? Or maybe they were super quiet and you enjoyed every day? The point is, it was a gamble - you never knew whom you ended up with. This is pretty much the same as having shared hosting account - you haven’t the faintest idea who is your roommate on a server. The analogy may sound funny but if someone on a shared server becomes a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack target or get blocked for mass mailing, other accounts on the server will be affected as well. Also, if a shared account abuses server resources, the whole server will be impacted. Using a VPS is like owning a house with a 9 foot privacy fence. You won’t be bothered no matter what your neighbors are doing.

Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.


I can’t say it as a disadvantage of VPS hosting because many of our VPS hosting customers have server administrator to manage their VPS and they manage it in very efficiently manner. But this doesn’t everyone must have server administrator, we have content-rich knowledge base on VPS hosting for our self-managed customers.Also, a managed service option at very affordable price.
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