VPS hosting contains the best elements of shared hosting and dedicated hosting services. Like shared hosting, VPS hosting puts your website on a server that also has other sites running on it, except that there are fewer sites per server. The sites share the cost of running on the server, which results in a monthly or yearly charge that's less than the relatively high price tag of dedicated hosting.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.


Shared hosting is not meant for websites that use large amounts of RAM. As your website grows and you add more and more content, you will start to see a decrease in your website’s load times. As soon as this happens, it’s an indication that you are maxing out your limits. Upgrading to a VPS will enable you to scale your website without having to worry about slow load times.

• Turbo SSD Hosting
• Turbo SSD Hosting

If the VPS you select is unmanaged, then as mentioned earlier, you will have to ensure that the server stays in good health and performs efficiently. If your server crashes or if you face any sort of security issue, be it a virus or a breach, then you will be responsible for restoring your server as the only administrator of the entire virtual private server. Hence, if you are well-versed in the functioning of servers and are knowledgeable with stuff such as rebooting, restarting, shutting down and repairing the server, you should consider opting for unmanaged hosting. On the other hand, if the last sentenced sounded alien to you, then you should consider paying slightly more and opting for a managed VPS.


I find it non-sense for the hosts to put anything less than 99% uptime on their pages, even if they have to lie. People will simply turn away if they write anything less than that. Some of my friends and I had experienced several down times on hosts who claimed the 99% uptime. I conclude that these numbers are just formalities without any serious meaning. Is that too heartless?
To sum up, a Windows server is more friendly to beginners but is less flexible and more expensive. A Linux server is cheaper and offers more freedom though it requires special skills and does not have a developed support system. Still, the most important question you need to ask yourself is whether your main goal requires Windows or Linux. If you need a Linux server for your needs but do not have required skills to manage it, you can sign up for a managed VPS.
Angela Olaru:
If you are familiar with hosting control panels, shell commands, and you have basic server administration and troubleshooting skills, then unmanaged VPS is the way to go. Note that while you purchase self­ managed VPS, you should be capable of managing applications, software, services installed on your VPS. Also, you must know installation/un­installations, resource monitoring, server performance tweaking and troubleshooting of any technical issues.
Hosting company team members stay up to date on best practices, new technologies, and current threats. They also quickly gain on-the-job experience working with a variety of environments and troubleshooting common issues. That means they know how to optimize your environment for performance and security, and they know how to quickly resolve common issues.
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