Remember those times when the grass was greener, the light was brighter, and no one cared what you were doing on the Internet? Well, those times have passed. Nowadays, regional targeting, government censorship, and geoblocking restrict you from accessing the content you want. In addition, we hear news about another Internet privacy scandal almost every week. If you wish to browse freely and securely, a VPN server comes in handy.
Of course, one of the most important factors in selecting a VPS is the cost attached to it. VPS providers will charge more for managed hosting and for using high end resources. Hence, you need to select a VPS which will not only operate effectively, but will also not cause a sizeable hole in your wallet.

Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.

Your A2 Hosting account comes pre-configured with PHP accelerator OPcache. External tests have shown OPcache offers up to 50% faster PHP processing! While some users prefer accelerators like eAccelerator or xCache, we've found the largest performance boost with OPcache. OPcache is available by default with PHP 5.5, while APC is available on previous PHP versions.


So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
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With a dedicated server, you can install any operating system. Cloud VPS offers a limited selection (at Liquid Web, it’s CentOS 6, CentOS 7, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Debian 8, Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard, and Windows Server 2016 Standard Edition.) Otherwise, both options give you full root access with control over the OS and all the software in the environment.

Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
High-availability and reliability seem to be the focus of InMotion VPS hosting. Their state-of-the-art Linux VPS Hosting servers are built on top of InMotion’s cloud-powered infrastructure which is designed for real time redundancy. Their VPS plans come with many advanced and free features, such as SSD storage, free cPanel license, and unlocked CPU cores. All of their VPS plans provide server management for updates and patches as well as 24x7 email and telephone support.
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Do you remember those times when you were living on a college campus with very noisy roommates? Or maybe they were super quiet and you enjoyed every day? The point is, it was a gamble - you never knew whom you ended up with. This is pretty much the same as having shared hosting account - you haven’t the faintest idea who is your roommate on a server. The analogy may sound funny but if someone on a shared server becomes a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack target or get blocked for mass mailing, other accounts on the server will be affected as well. Also, if a shared account abuses server resources, the whole server will be impacted. Using a VPS is like owning a house with a 9 foot privacy fence. You won’t be bothered no matter what your neighbors are doing.
                        

Having your own guaranteed CPU and RAM gives you a great deal of autonomy. You don’t have to share them with any other accounts, so no matter what anyone else does they will never slow you down. Regular shared hosting is okay if your website traffic doesn’t change much, but if there’s a chance it might need more horsepower then VPS is far more flexible. And from a security point of view, the fact that VPS hosting accounts are cleverly separated on the same server makes them much more robust than a shared hosting solution.

Michael Lavnduski:

Once you register your website's domain name, it's time to start picking the specs for your server. Web hosts typically offer multiple VPS plans that have varying amounts of email capability, RAM, storage, CPU power, domain hosting, and monthly data transfers. The plans typically include website builders that let you quickly create a face for your site without much—or even any—coding required. A solid web host should offer at least 4GB of RAM, 100GB of storage, and an ample volume of monthly data transfers. If you expect a significant amount of website growth, then you should look for a web host that has as many unlimited offerings as possible. For example, Hostwinds—the PCMag Editors' Choice for VPS hosting—offers unlimited email, domains, and monthly data transfers. Note, however, that as with all unlimited service offerings, you really need to read the fine print to make sure that what you mean by unlimited and what the hosting service means by it.
Liquid Web has worked hard to build a competitive VPS offering, and as mentioned in this guide, third-party testing has found our VPS hosting outperforms Rackspace, DigitalOcean, and Amazon's. Moreover, our customer reviews will bear out that our customer service and support teams, the Most Helpful Humans in HostingTM, deliver responsive support, pro-active service, and immense value to the businesses we work with.
VPS Hosting is ideal for small and medium size businesses that expect increased amounts of web traffic. For example, if you plan to run an Ecommerce site, you’ll be better off with a VPS hosting plan with dedicated resources than with a standard shared hosting plan. Also, for non-Ecommerce websites that have grown in terms of both the number of web pages and the amount of web users, VPS is the better option to ensure you have the necessary resources and power to continue operating for your site’s visitors.
I find it non-sense for the hosts to put anything less than 99% uptime on their pages, even if they have to lie. People will simply turn away if they write anything less than that. Some of my friends and I had experienced several down times on hosts who claimed the 99% uptime. I conclude that these numbers are just formalities without any serious meaning. Is that too heartless?
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If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.
Max Ostryzhko:
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
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