When you create a website, you have to pay a company to host it on their server. This is a powerful computer that allows anyone on the internet to connect and access your site. The lowest level of server is a shared hosting plan where hundreds of websites (and all their data) are stored on one server with all of the server’s resources up for grabs depending on who needs them.

Do you remember those times when you were living on a college campus with very noisy roommates? Or maybe they were super quiet and you enjoyed every day? The point is, it was a gamble - you never knew whom you ended up with. This is pretty much the same as having shared hosting account - you haven’t the faintest idea who is your roommate on a server. The analogy may sound funny but if someone on a shared server becomes a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack target or get blocked for mass mailing, other accounts on the server will be affected as well. Also, if a shared account abuses server resources, the whole server will be impacted. Using a VPS is like owning a house with a 9 foot privacy fence. You won’t be bothered no matter what your neighbors are doing.

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As more and more business is conducted online, an inability to scale digitally could also slow the growth of your business. A VPS solution like Hostway VPS could be the perfect solution for your expanding business. Hostway offers robust VPS with a unique approach that results in high performing cost-effective virtualization and efficient allocation of your dedicated server resources with the ability to add more when available.


You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.

The moment you plan on running an online store is the moment you should upgrade your hosting plan. Why? Because with VPS, you have a secure and dedicated virtual server where you are more likely to pass a PCI compliance test. The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard was established by major credit card brands to protect against cardholder data theft.
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Shared hosting usually works for small to medium web sites.  A shared host may be less costly, but it does not allow total control over the hosting environment.  A shared host does not permit the use of different operating systems or the installation of custom software.  It may be true many web site owners are not interested in the administration of a server and prefer leaving it to their host.  However, it is ideal if a web site owner desires more control and needs new software that is not available in a shared web hosting environment.  When looking for VPS hosting, one should look at the resources needed, the upgrade process, the application requirements and the number of accounts needed on each server to determine the appropriate amount of resources for a VPS.  The cost should be reasonable for what is offered.
With our dedicated servers, you rent an entire server. This is optimal for people that have very high traffic to their websites or need to setup their server in a very specific way. Not everyone needs to have a fully dedicated web server however. If you’re just getting started with your website, you can save quite a bit of money if you rent a small portion of the server. Shared hosting is when you share a portion of the server with other users rather than rent an entire server to yourself.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
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I have used shared hosting for over 7 years before I finally decided to upgrade to a VPS server. When I was using shared hosting, I had so many problems with malware, slow loading time, brute force attacks and so many other issues. Now, my life is so much easier with VPS. What amazes me the most is the support team; they simply exceed my expectations and they are ALWAYS available to answer my questions.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!
The web hosting company will also provide regular web server software, installed programming language extensions, & firewall upgrades. Managed VPS plans running Windows normally include the use of Plesk for administration of domains and web server settings, while VPS plans running Ubuntu, Debian, Slackware, etc. can be administered using Webmin or Virtualmin under a free open source license.

Having your own guaranteed CPU and RAM gives you a great deal of autonomy. You don’t have to share them with any other accounts, so no matter what anyone else does they will never slow you down. Regular shared hosting is okay if your website traffic doesn’t change much, but if there’s a chance it might need more horsepower then VPS is far more flexible. And from a security point of view, the fact that VPS hosting accounts are cleverly separated on the same server makes them much more robust than a shared hosting solution.
Nice read Rahul ! While you compare all hosting types, I would like to point out one important thing related to shared hosting. Undoubtedly, VPS hosting has become the most popular hosting type in short span, but shared hosting has its own benefits. First and most important one is – Shared Hosting is by Default Fully Managed, that means you don’t have to worry about security of your website, server updates, software update, spamming from your mailboxes, etc.

Ubuntu is one of the most popular desktop Linux distributions which also has a web server variant as well as the Kubuntu package. Overall, Ubuntu, Debian, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) are commonly found in web hosting and private cloud data centers in use as web servers, with Fedora and openSUSE more popular among independent web developers and PHP/Python programmers.


With VPS Hosting, there are multiple instances of separate operating systems on a machine—thus giving you your own virtual private server. So while you still may be sharing a physical server at the data center, with your own virtual operating system, you’re able to have dedicated resources such as RAM, bandwidth, and disk space. In other words, the environment mimics having a dedicated server—at a lower cost!
both for external and internal use, for documentation purposes. It essentially makes it intuitive for organizations and communities to generate content

VPS stands for Virtual Private Server and refers to a private, emulated dedicated hosting environment created through virtualization on a host (a computer or other device connected to other computers or devices via a network), server (called the “parent server”), or cluster of servers. It acts like a physical server but, in reality, it’s a piece of software that’s emulating dedicated hardware.
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