This means just a few domains could pull an entire reseller website offline if transfer limits are not closely monitored on a regular basis. Many Cloud VPS plans offer a "pay as you go" approach to billing where only the actual amount of CPU resources, storage, and I/O processes are billed. Systems administrators and website publishers need to calculate expected monthly traffic rates when estimating how many system resources are required to support a website in production. "Pay as you go" approaches can be more costly than fixed ratio accounts, where the trade-off is typically a more advanced VPS platform and toolset.
Shared hosting usually works for small to medium web sites.  A shared host may be less costly, but it does not allow total control over the hosting environment.  A shared host does not permit the use of different operating systems or the installation of custom software.  It may be true many web site owners are not interested in the administration of a server and prefer leaving it to their host.  However, it is ideal if a web site owner desires more control and needs new software that is not available in a shared web hosting environment.  When looking for VPS hosting, one should look at the resources needed, the upgrade process, the application requirements and the number of accounts needed on each server to determine the appropriate amount of resources for a VPS.  The cost should be reasonable for what is offered.
The answer to this question is a definitive “maybe.” Since you’re looking at this site, you might be a Web designer who has a few sites, an online portfolio, and a couple of long-standing clients whose sites you manage. Is a VPS for you? Well, you’ve most likely outgrown a shared platform, and as a professional, it won’t do to have your site run poorly because another site that you share a server with is using more than its fair share of resources. A dedicated server could be overkill – if you don’t need all the resources on a consistent basis, you may not be able to justify the expense.
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