As you can see, a VPS can be the perfect middle ground for many – enough flexibility and resources for those who need more access or control than on a shared server but without the cost of a dedicated server. If you need root access, you can’t get that on a shared server, but you can get it on a VPS. If your site experiences unpredictable swings memory usage, and your host provides it, then the presence of burstable memory will be attractive. And, if you’re a fan of customization, then the fact that you can customize server-level software such as PHP, MySQL, and Apache will perk your interest.  In short, choosing a VPS will allow you to have many of the same characteristics of a dedicated server but in a more affordable and manageable package.
From the above mentioned reasons, it is clear to see why cloud servers are such a favorite amongst the VPS crowd. Not only do they offer several benefits and are more secure, stable and efficient, they are extremely economical as well which is why they are preferred especially by those who are new to the business of running websites and hence, do not have a large or flexible budget.
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This doesn’t happen with VPS hosting because each mini-server has its own allotment of resources. You can’t use more resources than your allotment, but that also means that no other site can take resources from you. Basically, it is like having a smaller size dedicated server without having to pay the hefty ($100 per month or more) price tag that goes with a dedicated server.

From the above mentioned reasons, it is clear to see why cloud servers are such a favorite amongst the VPS crowd. Not only do they offer several benefits and are more secure, stable and efficient, they are extremely economical as well which is why they are preferred especially by those who are new to the business of running websites and hence, do not have a large or flexible budget.
When you create a website, you have to pay a company to host it on their server. This is a powerful computer that allows anyone on the internet to connect and access your site. The lowest level of server is a shared hosting plan where hundreds of websites (and all their data) are stored on one server with all of the server’s resources up for grabs depending on who needs them.
Installing the OS on HDD storage and low RAM VPS plans can be long and arduous, whereas managed VPS plans are available instantly with the full LAMP stack from shared hosting platforms pre-installed. Setting up a cloud VPS with server stack snapshots is much easier than command line administration, as well as much quicker. In summary, it largely depends on the user preferences of the system administrator which VPS installation approach is pursued or the requirements, budget, codebase, etc. of the website to be supported by the hosting can be taken as overriding factors in decision making.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]

If you emphasize on high-availability and top speed at the best price, you can choose Time4VPS. Its data center is setup according to TIER III level, which guarantees 99.95% uptime.

You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.

VPS hosting is like you are living in an apartment complex. It means that other people are living in the same building, but you have your own secure apartment. You will get more room and restrictions will be fewer as compared to living in a dorm. It also means that if your neighbour is misbehaving, it is the problem of owner of building, not yours.


Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.
You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
A VPS doesn’t just have more RAM, disk space, and a  proprietary share of CPU than a shared account. Depending on the provider, some VPS plans offer burstable memory, which is a pool of RAM set aside for extraordinary events. This is the stuff that can help counter the so-called “Digg-effect,” that much-whispered about occurrence that’s the simultaneous hope and fear of everyone who runs a web site. When you have an unexpected high traffic event, burstable memory will call on a pool of reserved, shared memory to satisfy the needs of temporary high traffic. This is not available on shared servers and, while the necessary memory is available on a dedicated server, your site might not get the kind of traffic on a daily basis to justify the expense of a dedicated server. Again, not all VPS plans have burstable memory, so ask your provider if their VPS plans do.

Do you remember those times when you were living on a college campus with very noisy roommates? Or maybe they were super quiet and you enjoyed every day? The point is, it was a gamble - you never knew whom you ended up with. This is pretty much the same as having shared hosting account - you haven’t the faintest idea who is your roommate on a server. The analogy may sound funny but if someone on a shared server becomes a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack target or get blocked for mass mailing, other accounts on the server will be affected as well. Also, if a shared account abuses server resources, the whole server will be impacted. Using a VPS is like owning a house with a 9 foot privacy fence. You won’t be bothered no matter what your neighbors are doing.
If you currently have a shared hosting plan, the main reason to move to a VPS hosting plan is resource utilization. The issue really isn’t that your website is running slow, but rather it needs to be able to handle more web traffic. Your current web host will usually inform you when you’re exceeding shared hosting resource limits. That’s the ideal time to switch to VPS. With a virtual private server, you’ll have your own operating system and dedicated resources for increased power. Your site will then be able to handle increased traffic. And, you’ll have even better insulation from other hosting customers.
Having your own guaranteed CPU and RAM gives you a great deal of autonomy. You don’t have to share them with any other accounts, so no matter what anyone else does they will never slow you down. Regular shared hosting is okay if your website traffic doesn’t change much, but if there’s a chance it might need more horsepower then VPS is far more flexible. And from a security point of view, the fact that VPS hosting accounts are cleverly separated on the same server makes them much more robust than a shared hosting solution.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
VPS stands for Virtual Private Server and refers to a private, emulated dedicated hosting environment created through virtualization on a host (a computer or other device connected to other computers or devices via a network), server (called the “parent server”), or cluster of servers. It acts like a physical server but, in reality, it’s a piece of software that’s emulating dedicated hardware.


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Similarly, in the case of VPS, there are several users that are using the same server but they are isolated from each other. It means that no one will be affected by how much resources another is using. You will get the speed and security that you need without compromise. It is almost a perfect scenario because you will get the benefits of a private server with shared cost of services.


And if your “neighbor” on the server is hacked, there’s little chance the infection will spread to your VPS because the hypervisors that are used to create separate VPS environments deliver multi-layered network security and keep tight controls on what enters and leaves. Your root access also means you can add or customize your VPS security software as you please.
both for external and internal use, for documentation purposes. It essentially makes it intuitive for organizations and communities to generate content
Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.
Shared hosting is cheap and allows you to install any gallery platform you wish if a hosting plan meets its requirements. But be careful and study your hosting provider’s Acceptable Use Policy thoroughly. The truth is, that even if they claim unlimited storage with their plans, they don’t want you to use much of it. On the contrary, they secretly hope that you will use less and they can host many other clients on the same server. For that reason, hosting providers usually put limitations on their policies (e.g. “no more than 10 GB for images,” etc.). So don’t be convinced that you have unlimited storage without first checking your shared hosting provider's policies or you will find your account suspended someday.
Having your own guaranteed CPU and RAM gives you a great deal of autonomy. You don’t have to share them with any other accounts, so no matter what anyone else does they will never slow you down. Regular shared hosting is okay if your website traffic doesn’t change much, but if there’s a chance it might need more horsepower then VPS is far more flexible. And from a security point of view, the fact that VPS hosting accounts are cleverly separated on the same server makes them much more robust than a shared hosting solution.

• Free SSL Certificate

• 100% Network Uptime Guarantee


High-availability and reliability seem to be the focus of InMotion VPS hosting. Their state-of-the-art Linux VPS Hosting servers are built on top of InMotion’s cloud-powered infrastructure which is designed for real time redundancy. Their VPS plans come with many advanced and free features, such as SSD storage, free cPanel license, and unlocked CPU cores. All of their VPS plans provide server management for updates and patches as well as 24x7 email and telephone support.

Are you ready to move your site to A2 Hosting, but nervous about doing the actual site migration to our servers by yourself? Don't be! In most cases we can move your site for free. Just contact our friendly 24/7/365 Guru Crew Support team to request that they move your site for you! It's a worry-free migration! That means there's no more barriers for you to get your hands on all of our site speed optimization resources! Isn't it about time that you love your web host?



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However, if a bad user shares your server with you, they can threaten your security and allow hackers to easily reach your content and critical data. Furthermore, because you’re all sharing the same resources, if any of the users that you’re sharing your server with use a lot of memory or their site has a lot of traffic, your website’s performance is likely to suffer.


There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!
Keep firmly in your mind the sort of assets that you require to serve your site(s) when seeking a host. Cost in a VPS is important, but not as key as you might think. VPS resource availability is scalable, so the cost that needs to be looked at is comparable cost from one host to the next. Also – as cPanel revised their pricing model recently, web hosting companies across the board will have to pass those costs on to users sooner or later. You will need to consider the cost of control panel when selecting a VPS plan. Companies like ScalaHosting has developed their own control panel to mitigate this issue – so their users would have little issues with the price hike.

If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.
When smartphones took over in the early 2000s, data usage and cellphone bills went through the roof for many families — mine included. My family’s shared data plan wasn’t perfect — some months, someone would rack up data usage and leave the rest of us strapped — but it allowed each person to pay a lot less per month than if we each had an unlimited data plan.
Shared hosting is not meant for websites that use large amounts of RAM. As your website grows and you add more and more content, you will start to see a decrease in your website’s load times. As soon as this happens, it’s an indication that you are maxing out your limits. Upgrading to a VPS will enable you to scale your website without having to worry about slow load times.
VPS ensures that your website continues to run smoothly, regardless of what is happening elsewhere on the server. It also protects your data from multiple sites, giving you a secure piece of virtual real estate to build a website on.
Ultimately, it is used to decrease hardware costs by condensing a failover cluster to a single machine. Thus decreasing costs dramatically while providing the same services. Server roles and features are generally designed to operate in isolation. For example, Windows Server 2019 requires a certificate authority and a domain controller to exist on independent servers with independent instances of windows server. This is because additional roles and features adds areas of potential failure as well as adding visible security risks (placing a certificate authority on a domain controller poses the potential for root access to the root certificate). This directly motivates demand for virtual private servers in order to retain conflicting server roles and features on a single hosting machine. Also, the advent of virtual machine encrypted networks decreases pass-through risks that might have otherwise discouraged VPS usage as a legitimate hosting server.
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Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
One of the reasons that VPS hosting has become popular is to have a staging environment.  For instance, one private server could have the actual website or application and the other a copy of it.  If a critical update of the application or software needs to be made, the update may be tested on the staging server before committing any changes to a live production server. This permits testing before scheduling and performing maintenance and upgrades to a live production environment.
The "slashdot" effect is the main problem which will lead to VPS hosted website crashes more than any other. For example, if a VPS plan has an allocation of 2 GB of RAM and 2 CPU cores with a maximum support for around 200 simultaneous users of a complex Drupal or WordPress site, a popular social media link may temporarily increase traffic to a website 10x or 100x. In these cases, the VPS will crash... unless the overflow can be managed by burstable RAM or elastic cloud scalability. In elastic frameworks, the network monitoring software simply launches a new VPS instance with a cloned & synchronized version of the website files that can manage the additional user demand. When the traffic spikes decrease, elastic server networks can automatically scale down VPS instances to conserve resource utilization in production.

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When you create a website, you have to pay a company to host it on their server. This is a powerful computer that allows anyone on the internet to connect and access your site. The lowest level of server is a shared hosting plan where hundreds of websites (and all their data) are stored on one server with all of the server’s resources up for grabs depending on who needs them.
Often, for purposes of anonymity, people prefer offshore VPS as compared to those available within their country. Offshore VPS are more difficult to trace and hence, offer greater anonymity. On the other hand, others prefer offshore servers due to a greater protection of freedom offered by the foreign country as compared to their own. Meanwhile, some decide to opt for offshore servers as they are promised far greater speeds by the providers as compared to the options present within their own country.
First of all, root access offers independence from the hosting provider in terms of software. While the hosting provider still manages the server’s hardware, a choice of software is on a user. It’s you, not your hosting provider, who decides when it is the right time to upgrade, for example, cPanel or MariaDB. We cannot say that this freedom is absolute, though, compared to the dedicated hosting plan. If a bare-metal server has hosted hypervisor installed, its OS must be compatible with a guest OS. For instance, if a physical machine runs Linux, it’s impossible to install Windows as a guest OS. A native hypervisor is compatible with any OS. Apart from that limitation (and apart from illegal activities, of course), VPS users can install whatever software they want.
“After having shared hosting plans with other providers for many years, I switched all of my sites to Liquid Web a few months ago for my first VPS experience. It's been smooth, fast, and easy to use. At one point I suddenly ran out of disk space, and within minutes I was able to use their system to upgrade my plan and move my site to a larger partition.” – David K.
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